Make your own free website on Tripod.com

URBANICITY.info

Hunter S. Thompson obit

WELCOME TO URBANICITY
SENSING URBANITY
LISTENING FOR WORDS
VIEWING IMAGES OF MYSTERY
LOVING MUSIC
READING FOR LIVING
CELEBRATING THE MIND
TRAVELING TO EXPLORE
SEARCHING THE FUTURE
MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Hey, Rube.

gonzo.jpg

As a sports writer Hunter S. Thompson injected his joy or disgust into his stories. As for politics, since 2000 it was just disgust. In his book "Hey Rube," published in 2004, he bounced between these two passions-– railing against blood sports and the downward spiral of dumbness. He called the collection "Modern History from the Sports Desk."

"We have seen weird times in this country before, but the year 2000 is beginning to look super weird. This time there really is nobody flying the plane. We are living in dangerously weird times now. Smart people just shrug and admit they’re dazed and confused. The only ones left with any confidence at all are the New Dumb. It is the beginning of the end of our world as we knew it. Doom is the operative ethic.

So let’s stick it to sports. He thought the best thing about the Kentucky Derby is that it is only two minutes long. He made a list of New Rules to limit all baseball, football, and hockey games to three hours, at which time the score would be final. He wanted the baseball season trimmed to 110 games– and over by Labor Day.

He thought that Congress should pass a special criminal fraud law to permanently banish professional boxing. "Pro football is a pure sport. It may be fixed, but at least it is artfully fixed,"– unlike boxing: "a horrible traveling hoax that’s turned itself into a bag of poison scum."

He was a oner– a vulnerable, honorable, and vital writer who made his own, somewhat outrageous, rules. A native of Kentucky, he lived his later life in a fortified compound near Aspen, Colorado, where he worked hard, and-- when friends came to visit- played gleefully.

 

return to "Reading for Living"

Remain curious.